New Light in Old Spaces

The market potential for putting modern LED lighting systems in existing buildings dwarfs new construction, but in many ways it’s a more challenging market to serve.

Doug Chandler Blog | Apr 05, 2019

Thanks to the humble light-emitting diode, the lighting market is among the brighter sectors for distributors in an electrical industry that’s growing steadily overall. Most of the attention goes to new buildings where architects and lighting designers are pushing the boundaries of what the latest LED lighting technology and intelligent controls can do. 

Meanwhile, look around you at all the buildings that make up your city and you’ll quickly realize that all those offices, shops, conference rooms and lobbies, factories, warehouses and parking garages where people spend their days beneath old fluorescent, incandescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting could benefit from the same technologies that are going into new buildings. The trick is getting them in there. 

The scale of the opportunity is hard to estimate and there’s no real consensus. John Engel, CEO of WESCO Distribution, Pittsburgh, told analysts in the company’s quarterly earnings discussion in January, in response to questions about WESCO’s rationale for acquiring Sylvania Lighting Services, that estimates of the lighting retrofit market’s size are in the neighborhood of $300 billion. 

“It’s a tremendous growth engine, and there’s a lot of really interesting developments and dynamics occurring in that market,” Engel said. 

Using 2016 numbers, a report from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared by Navigant found that 874 million of the lighting systems installed through that year in the United States were LED, which captured 12.6% of the market that year. 

The report, “Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications,” showed that LEDs have seen much more success replacing outdoor lighting, at 29.7% overall, including parking garage and building exterior lighting, both past 30%. Indoors, the penetration rates are smaller at 12.3% overall, but growing quickly. LEDs have taken over 47.6% of small directional light installations, 19.8% of downlighting and 15.3% of directional lighting. 

The major lighting category where LEDs have penetrated least among the categories covered in the study is linear fixtures, but even in that application LEDs’ penetration grew from 1.3% in 2014 to 6% in 2016 and by all accounts has continued to grow since then.

Those figures for the lighting market as a whole suggest an even greater untapped opportunity for retrofits, given that LED penetration percentages in existing buildings are still somewhere in the single digits. 

Historically, lighting sales were tied closely to new construction. Fixtures and ballasts were installed during construction and after that sales were primarily for replacement lamps and the occasional tenant turnover or refresh. LED lighting has changed that picture fundamentally, making the entire installed base a potential market for new lighting systems. 

Getting a handle on the retrofit market means adjusting to some of its nuances. For example, lighting equipment specifications in retrofit projects tend to vary widely, far moreso than new construction due to the variety of incumbent light sources with existing buildings. “A new construction project being specified by a lighting designer or an engineering firm has so much less variation from proposal to proposal,” says Randy Johnson, who sold his lighting distributorship, US Lamp, Inc. to Werner Electric Supply Co. in Appleton, WI in January 2019, and is now Werner’s Lighting Solutions Manager, based in Green Bay. “The specifier will call out his preferred brand of high-bay, based on their designs, and say it needs to have this lumen output, and at least this many lumens-per-Watt, this color rendering index, et cetera. The tighter the spec the less variation there is. On the retrofit side, it’s a whole hodge-podge, because typically the end-user doesn’t hire someone to develop a solution and the product called out for is at the whim and expertise of the vendor quoting the customer, which can vary widely.”

Retrofits also tend to happen on a much faster time frame than construction projects, says John Dellorto, VP of sales for Focal Point, a lighting manufacturer based in Chicago. “Most tenant improvement jobs are fast-track. The landlord doesn’t want to lose rent for too many months. He wants to turn it around in eight to 12 weeks, so he’ll hire an architect or some kind of lighting consultant to do it and they’ll come to us,” he said. “It gets going pretty quickly. The runway on a new construction project is a much longer cycle; you will know 24 months before it’s bid or breaks ground.”

The rapid pace and broad variability of the retrofit market mean that distributors and reps need to be in the loop early on, to keep from “chasing the spec” to get their lines added as equivalent alternatives or worse, resorting to a fight on price. 

Cast of Thousands

For distributors, selling lighting systems for retrofit projects involves cultivating relationships with a more diverse set of buying influences than new construction. Construction projects tend to have a predictable flow of influences including the developer, engineers, architects, lighting designers and of course the lighting rep, whose presence is felt throughout. In a retrofit project the tenant may play a central role, or none at all. The property manager or facilities manager may be the key decision maker, or in the case of a large corporate tenant or a university campus they may have an energy manager tasked with reducing energy consumption across all facilities.

Forging strong, long-term relationships with municipalities, school campus, and industrial facilities managers and others may be the best path to growth in the retrofit lighting market. That can start from anywhere, from online queries to cold calls, but the best opening may be your existing customers who are buying other kinds of electrical equipment, says Johnson of Werner Electric Supply.

“In the retrofit market it’s really a matter of going in and making the customer aware of opportunities that are there that they might not realize. What we’ve done, both as US Lamp and Werner, is get a dialog going with whoever we’ve got the relationship with. If it’s product other than lighting that a given person is responsible for, we can have a fundamental discussion about who would be involved with lighting improvements. It might be the energy manager, might be the facility manager, might be the executive committee, but we’ll open a dialog and ask them, ‘Have you looked at any of this LED technology? We’ll come in and do a first-level observation of your facility for you, at no charge, as a value-added service as a current or potential customer to determine what opportunities are present in lighting and controls.”

Developing long-term relationships with the people involved in existing real estate can avoid having the conversation devolve to price. “Distributors are often not in contact with the end customer and, in the bidding process, will offer bare minimum to provide a low bid,” says Jim Williams, president of Chicago-area lighting rep agency KSA Lighting & Controls, Hanover Park, IL. “Too often we see distributors leading with the lowest cost product with no regards to service on the front end or post sales. In the long run they are having their credibility and reputation impacted negatively because of this.”

Jason Barbour, CEO of START Lighting, a commercial lighting manufacturer in Engelwood, CO, spent 20 years in electrical and lighting distribution before moving into manufacturing. He says distributors are under assault by online suppliers and customers who want to buy direct from manufacturers, but he sees distribution continuing to play a pivotal role in the retrofit lighting market. 

“I still think distribution has the ability to take control, because it owns the relationships,” he says. He points to some large national distributors who have built sales teams dedicated to the retrofit market. “Those folks pay for themselves relatively quickly. They say, ‘We want to grow our retrofit market.’ You go out and forge relationships and go from there.”

Energy and Returns

Energy savings has been one of the strongest selling points for LED lighting since it emerged on the scene. Lifetime energy savings attracted many customers and utility and government rebates helped to sweeten the deal. Distributors, reps and manufacturers serving the retrofit market say the energy savings are still persuasive for owners and building managers and tenants, but the sale also requires a firm grasp of the financial picture and the ability to convey the savings in terms that are compelling for a financial manager. 

“The driving force today in the retrofit market is still by far energy savings, first cost and simple ROI,” says Williams of KSA Lighting & Controls. “Bargain hunters may purchase 3rd tier products at a low cost that on paper provide an attractive ROI not realizing the lumen maintenance and life of the product are not what they expected. 

“The good news is that forward thinkers are investing in connected smart lighting and preparing their buildings to be future proofed and IOT compatible,” Williams adds. “These customers understand the value of the connected system with sensors on board each fixture that will provide the granular control and deep energy savings they desire. These energy savings will pay for the cost of the smart system.”

Energy service companies (ESCOs) have focused on selling the financial picture ahead of the specific technologies forever, and the emphasis has shifted a little, says Chris Gersch, president of Verde Systems, an ESCO in Chicago. “The emphasis now is no money out of pocket. The conversation used to lead with ROI and endless savings, but now it’s, ‘Are you cash flow positive?’”

Rebates drove some of the early action in the market and can accelerate the payback on a project, but many utilities have backed off recently or shifted to incentives in other areas. “Rebates were more important two years ago,” says Dellorto of Focal Point Lighting. “Utilities were offering rebates on LEDs but now they assume that’s what will be installed and feel they don’t have to incentivize the customer.”

Meanwhile the competitive landscape of the semiconductor industry that has taken over the lighting market and the influx of low-cost competitors that come with it have driven pricing down across the market, making financial paybacks from energy savings even faster. 

Taking Control

The evolution of LED lighting technologies appears to have leveled off lately compared to the breakneck pace of advances seen a few years ago. Some customers see little difference among the product offerings. As one distributor said, in their mind an LED is an LED. Distributors can find themselves feeding into that impression if they don’t stay up with the benefits that continue to emerge, such as the possibilities for productivity improvements from “human-centric” lighting or more generally the aesthetics and design options available with tunable color. 

What seems to get customers excited right now, though, comes more from the control side. The emergence of wireless lighting control has changed the game for retrofits, removing the headaches and cost and locked-in feeling of hard-wired proprietary systems while giving end users huge gains in flexible use of their lighting systems. 

“The last two years have changed the conversation,” says Gersch of Verde Solutions. “Not so much around LED, everyone knows about that by now. But customers are now far more aware of sensors, whether it’s motion sensors, daylight dimmers, and so on, compatibility with building automation systems and things like that.”

Williams of KSA Lighting & Controls thinks LED fixtures without controls will be uncommon in the near future. “Customers really get excited about the controls and features that a connected smart system offers like setting the AV mode with the push of a button in a classroom, fixtures with daylight harvesting that dim by zone, exterior fixtures that provide the lighting levels they desire for safety and also provide deep savings by dimming 70% or more when the space is not occupied.”

The flexibility to reconfigure lighting zones and control them separately from a mobile device provides compelling benefits for many customers such as large manufacturing operations where changes in production and demand may require dividing up the plant floor space differently over time, or open office settings where desks and seating areas may need to be redone on occasion. 

With the advances in wireless controls and the declining cost of LED lighting systems generally, sales people in the field are seeing opportunity everywhere they look. Given the scope of the opportunity it seems likely to continue for many years. But once modern lighting systems are installed in most existing buildings, the conversation is almost certain to change again. The life expectancy of modern LED lighting and the continuing advance of future-ready configurable systems will yield a very different competitive landscape once this fun is done.    

North American Smart Lighting Market Projected to Exceed $6 Billion

According to a new growth forecast report by Graphical Research, the North American smart lighting market is expected to surpass $6 billion by 2024. Market growth is attributed to a growing emphasis on replacing conventional lighting systems with energy-efficient smart lighting solutions in the U.S. and Canada.

Between 2018 and 2024, the technology market is expected to register a robust growth with a CAGR of around 30%. The increased integration of wireless communication technologies—including Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and Zigbee—into smart lighting solutions is aiding the consistent growth of the technology market in the region.

In October 2016, the U.S. Department of Transportation sparked a reduction in energy consumption when it invested $165 million in smart city technologies, leveraging IoT-operated devices including smart lights, sensors and meters for road safety maintenance.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission also replaced around 18,500 streetlights with light emitting diodes. The adoption of these smart lighting solutions will reduce the energy consumption by 50%, decreasing electricity costs and improving the environmental efficiency.

6 Ways Companies Are Using Data Analytics to Reduce Expenses

Expense reduction is a constant goal for most companies. Fortunately, data analytics can assist with keeping costs down in several ways. Here are six of them.

1. To Cut Fleet Management Expenses

There’s a rising trend in equipping vehicles from company fleets with Internet of Things (IoT) sensors that give management personnel details about things ranging from truck routes to driver fatigue.

One company that participated in a research study to pinpoint the effects of big data analytics on logistics operations found it was possible to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions by relying on data analytics software.

Other applications include depending on sensor data to inform maintenance needs, which could cut costs associated with breakdowns, or using the data to assess which drivers frequently engage in risky practices that make those employees liabilities for their companies.

2. To Lessen Instances of Employee Turnover

Human relations professionals are familiar with the extensive costs associated with employee onboarding. But, the total expenses could climb even higher if employees are poor fits for the company and leave quickly after getting hired. According to 2018 data from Work Institute, employers will pay $680 billion in turnover costs by 2020, and companies could prevent 77 percent of turnovers.

Many companies use analytics before hiring candidates because it allows them to analyze information, such as the likelihood of someone aligning with a company’s culture. Big data can also track trends that could indicate a person currently working at a company is getting frustrated in the role and might leave for another opportunity.

As such, businesses that use data analytics in these ways could avoid the costs associated with training new employees that don’t stick around, or not recognizing when an employee is so unhappy they want to leave.

3. To Manage and Minimize Indirect Costs

Indirect costs are those associated with the operations of a company, but not related to products sold. Statistics indicate reducing indirect costs could save companies more than 25 percent in overall expenses. The categories of indirect expenses vary by each enterprise that incurs them, but some of the common ones include rent, utilities and office supplies.

Companies can’t start to reduce their indirect costs without knowing the average amount they spend on things each month. Big data analysis helps in this area by providing baselines that inform enterprises of their most substantial indirect expenses. Then, people can start figuring out where to make improvements.

One accessible way for companies to get started is to invest in IoT utility products like smart light bulbs and thermostats. Those items typically let users know statistics such as the average amount of energy used per month. Some even give tips for cutting utility bills.

Plus, printers and copiers can predict future supply needs based on usage patterns, then alert users to order things like ink and toner before those things run out. People can also log in to specialized dashboards to study trends.

4. To Shorten Testing Processes

Companies frequently go through tests associated with segments of their target markets before launching new products or updating their websites. Such testing helps avoid failures that could occur when businesses don’t connect with their audiences. Analytics platforms make tests less time-consuming, and thereby not as expensive.

Chime Bank wanted to increase the number of people signing up for new accounts and believed personalized content would help reach that goal. When choosing new content for its website, the company deployed a predictive analytics platform that used artificial intelligence to make the process more efficient. Doing that enabled the company to test 216 homepage versions and 21 ideas in only three months.

5. To Avoid Making Customers Upset

Businesses must not overlook how unsolved grievances may cause customers to get frustrated, leading to a rise in preventable costs. According to a report from NewVoiceMedia, there’s a rise in “serial switchers,” or people who willingly go to other providers after getting displeased with the former ones due to bad experiences.

Coverage from Forbes about the report says poor customer service costs brands more than $75 billion annually. But, high-tech analytics software, such as what many call centers use, can evaluate characteristics like tone of voice and word choice to determine when customers start to get frustrated.

Also, Salesforce has a platform called Customer 360 that aims to soothe customers differently. It allows customer service representatives to see the full picture of a customer’s interactions during communications. Then, a caller does not have to keep explaining their situation over and over again to workers in different departments.

6. To Monitor for Cyberattacks

Cyberattacks can disrupt website functionality, erode consumer trust and lead to decreased employee morale, among other adverse effects. Moreover, companies often do not anticipate the total expenses of those issues. A 2019 report from Radware found the average cost of a cyberattack was $1.1 million.

Data analytics platforms for cybersecurity purposes can check network traffic continually and give notifications of suspicious behavior that could indicate breach attempts. Many offerings have AI components, too.

Data Analysis Makes Expense Reduction More Straightforward

It’s not easy to assess where and how to cut expenses. But, these examples show how data analysis can help people make those judgments with confidence.

The 10 big lighting trends for 2019

WHAT'S IN store for the lighting industry in 2019?

The big mega trends of recent years will continue of course, as digital disruption will challenge some business models and create opportunities for others, especially those who can make digital experiences a seamless and positive customer experience. Here’s our take on 10 trends we expect to see in the coming 12 months.

 

The supply chain will breakdown

The client-specifier-manufacturer-wholesaler-contractor supply chain used to be understood by everybody. But with FMs buying from Amazon and margin-chasing contractors bullying manufacturers for rebates, the supply chain is getting more twisted out of shape than a Labour spokesperson explaining the party’s policy on Brexit.

Power Line Communication will go mainstream

Power line communication – a sophisticated reprisal of the ‘mains borne’ signalling of the 1970s – has been the unexpected tech trend in lighting control in recent years. It beats wireless on many levels and is getting adopted by big players such as shopping mall giant Intu and automotive manufacturer Volvo.

Consolidation will accelerate

After the companies jump a few pesky regulatory hurdles this month, iGuzzini will join the Fagerhult Group as the jewel in the crown of its recent acquisitions. While it’s certainly one of the most eye-catching takeovers in the industry it won’t be the last. Driven by falling luminaire prices, consolidation will accelerate this year.

 

Bluetooth Mesh will gain traction

Bluetooth is the new big beast in the lighting controls world and its mesh technology brings simple wireless control to large installations. The familiarity of Bluetooth, the marketing muscle behind the brand and the open protocol nature of the technology will mean its entry into the mainstream lighting is a smooth one.

VR will arrive as a design tool

Virtual reality games may have enlivened your Christmas break but expect 2019 to be the year that they have a serious impact in lighting design. The big architectural practices are already using the tool to get clients excited and Signify - formerly Philips – is investing heavily in the technology as a design and marketing tool.

 Visual comfort will move up the agenda

The right to experience artificial lighting without nasties such as glare and flicker has taken a back seat in recent years as we’ve embraced the stunning energy saving possibilities of LEDs. But expect visual comfort to make a comeback with increasing demand for warm colour temperatures and high CRIs.

Smart hubs will be cut out

The tangle of twinkling ‘smart hubs’ and ‘intelligent bridges’ you need to get your lamps connected to the internet will become a thing of the past. Led by GE’s release of its C by GE light bulbs and C-Start switches this year, lighting will increasingly connect directly to Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple’s HomeKit and even Siri.

 Self-learning control will arrive

Led by the stunning success of Nest’s digital thermostats which learn about a user’s habits over time and anticipate changes, intuitive control will begin to arrive in the lighting world. Helvar is first out of the blocks with its Active+ system, but a flurry of patent applications in recent months show entrepreneurs are betting its the next big thing in lighting.

1970s design will return

The feminine palette of chalky pinks, brass and er, flamingos is so over, the interior fashionistas tell us. The big trend in interiors is a return to the 1970s but this time with better materiality and softer colours. Expect product designers to blow the dust off Concord and iGuzzini catalogues from the era in the search for inspiration

Modular design will spread

LED luminaire makers can’t believe their luck. They’ve got away with integral products where extracting a failed driver or light source is harder than getting compensation from Ryanair. But European chiefs are on their tail. Expect Eco Design legislation to tighten and put pressure on manufacturers to have deconstruct-able luminaires.

DOE Lighting Rollback Proposal Will Cost Consumers Billions

The U.S. Department of Energy’s proposal to dramatically narrow the scope of light bulbs covered by the upcoming federal 2020 energy efficiency standards will cost consumers up to $12 billion on their utility bills and cause up to 25 more coal burning power plants’ worth of electricity to be generated every year. This extra electricity use, enough to power all the households in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, translates into 34 million tons of additional climate-changing carbon dioxide emissions each year.

DOE’s new proposal rolls back most of the definition that was previously updated in early 2017 by DOE under the Obama administration, and needlessly provides a lifeline for the inefficient incandescent and halogen bulbs designed to go into 2.7 billion sockets—just under half of all conventional sockets in the United States—even though more energy-efficient models exist today. Now, instead of the energy-wasting versions being phased out as scheduled, three-way bulbs, reflector bulbs used in recessed cans and floodlights, candle-shaped bulbs used in chandeliers and sconces, and round globe bulbs typically used in bathroom lighting fixtures would be exempt from the federal standards that require all general-service lamps (GSLs, the regulatory term for everyday light bulbs) to meet a minimum efficiency limit of 45 lumens per watt (LPW) by January 1, 2020. Lumens are the amount of light produced, and watts the amount of power used.

The 45-LPW standard essentially prohibits the future sale of incandescents and halogens because they cannot meet this minimum efficiency level. Instead, consumers will choose between efficient, long-lasting CFLs and LED bulbs as of January 1, 2020. Consumers are likely to purchase LEDs because of their superior performance.

But if the bulbs going into almost half of America’s light sockets are now excluded from the 2020 efficiency standards because they are not part of the general-service light bulb definition, a huge amount of money and energy will be wasted. It adds up to annual lost savings of $12 billion in 2025 alone.

And if this revised definition is adopted, the United States will be positioned to become the world’s dumping ground for inefficient light bulbs, as they have already been phased out throughout Europe and elsewhere, with similar phaseouts planned in many developing countries.

The announcement was made within hours of Daniel Simmons being sworn in as the new assistant secretary in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), which administers energy efficiency standards. DOE didn’t stop there, however, as the agency today also issued a separate proposal to change its Process Rule, which would make it harder for DOE to update or set new energy efficiency standards for any product in the future, whether it be a refrigerator, hot water heater, or air conditioner. The proposal sets up all sorts of barriers designed to slow progress and compromise the highly successful standards program that saves the average household more than $500 on their energy bills every year. Meanwhile, the Trump administration has made essentially no progress on efficiency standards for appliances and equipment since taking office in early 2017. The DOE is required by law to review standards within a set time frame, and yet it has missed 16 deadlines for energy-saving standards, plus many more for test procedures.

Why LEDs Are Far Superior

The old incandescent light bulbs are so inefficient that up to 90 percent of the energy they use is wasted as heat. They get so hot you can burn yourself when you touch one. LEDs, on the other hand, are extremely efficient in the way they produce light. In fact, you can replace an old 60-watt incandescent light bulb with an LED bulb that only uses 10 watts but produces the same amount of light. Today’s LED bulbs are available in the same shapes as the incandescent and halogen bulbs they replace, making them a perfect drop-in substitute.

LED bulbs produce the same quality of light, turn on instantly, are dimmable, and last 10 to 25 years under normal operation of three hours per day, compared with just one to two years for most incandescents and halogens. They’re also available in a range of colors—from the “warm” yellowish-white light many of us associate with incandescent bulbs to the “cooler” bluish-white light of some newer bulbs—so LED users are sure to find a bulb that meets their needs and tastes.

Due to their superior energy efficiency and longer life, LED bulbs are extremely cost effective. Each LED bulb can save consumers between $50 and $100 over its lifetime compared with the equivalent incandescent or halogen. Plus, the consumer avoids the hassle and cost of having to replace the bulb every year.

An Energy-Saving LED for Virtually Every Socket

LED light bulbs are widely available in an assortment of shapes and light outputs from a variety of manufacturers. Below are sample images of the new LED bulbs and the inefficient bulbs they replace.

Reflector Bulbs

There are roughly 1 billion sockets in the United States today that contain a reflector bulb. These include track lighting and the increasingly popular recessed cans, also known as downlights, in new and remodeled homes. Drop-in LED replacements are widely available in all the same shapes, light outputs, and beam angles. The LED model shown below uses 7 watts instead of the 65-watt incandescent version.

Round Globe Bulbs 

DOE’s scope rollback would allow the ongoing sale of inefficient round globe incandescent bulbs. There is nothing different about these bulbs other than the shape of the enclosure, being round instead of pear-shaped like the most common bulbs. One can easily imagine consumers picking this bulb for their fixtures (due to the product’s slightly lower purchase price) instead of the LED, if the pear-shaped incandescent is no longer available. The LED replacement for a 60-watt incandescent globe bulb only uses 6 or so watts.

Candelabra/Flame Bulbs

Chandeliers can easily contain six or more candle/flame-shaped bulbs. These bulbs, termed candelabra bulbs, have a narrow or medium screw base, and the incandescent version typically uses 25, 40, or 60 watts of power, depending on its brightness. But energy-efficient LED replacement bulbs that last 10 to 25 times longer are widely available from a broad range of manufacturers in a variety of styles. Three-Ways

Three-Ways

While three-way bulbs are not that common today, their sales could easily skyrocket once the 45-LPW standard for conventional pear-shaped A-lamps goes into effect in 2020. Consumers who are looking for roughly the same amount of light as their old 60-W or 100-W incandescent or equivalent halogen bulb could simply buy a three-way incandescent. And these can be purchased for less than $1 on the web today. Three-way LED replacement bulbs are now widely available, and while they cost a bit more to purchase, they use a fraction of the energy and have a payback of less than a year.

DOE Can Still Do the Right Thing

The facts are clear and unambiguous—long-lasting, energy-saving bulbs already exist for the types of bulbs DOE proposes to exempt from the regulations, which could cost our nation up to $300 billion in cumulative lost utility bill savings by 2050. It would be outrageous if DOE and the Trump administration adopt this gutted definition of light bulbs and deny consumers the benefits of commonsense standards that will ensure a money-saving, energy-efficient bulb for every socket in the nation. This is a rollback that no one can afford.

Human-centric office lighting ‘boosts productivity’

THE INSTALLATION of 'human-centric' lighting at the office of the property company CBRE has boosted productivity by 18 per cent, results of an experiment show.

Additionally, work accuracy improved by 12 per cent, 76 per cent of employees reported feeling happier and half felt healthier.

The findings – by scientists from the Twente University, The Free University Amsterdam – will be seized on by the lighting industry as long-awaited hard evidence that investment in dynamic lighting gives a tangible return.

The time-controlled lighting system features a ‘circadian-friendly’ lighting sequence, which varies the colour temperature and intensity during the course of the day. Employees are stimulated during the morning and early afternoon with high illuminance levels and cool indirect white light. At midday and late afternoon, the light levels fall and become warmer.

The general lighting pendants feature direct light with a colour temperature of 4000K and ulta-cool indirect monochrome light of 6500K. The latter component is distributed across the ceiling during the course of the day via the separately controllable direct and indirect components.

Additionally, light sources were aligned onto the walls to create high vertical illuminance levels. Luminaires suspended from the ceiling in the open office area generate a pleasant indirect light component and avoid glare. In total, the luminous intensity was almost doubled.

The Arktika-P Biolux tunable white system from Osram was used for the general lighting of the office.

The 124 employees at the CBRE headquarters in Amsterdam were then surveyed over seven months, with more than 100,000 data records analysed. The survey included questionnaires, experiments, biological data, daily movement evaluations and interviews.

The Healthy Offices project, as the survey was dubbed, measured the effects of changes in work surroundings and health over a period of seven months. The team of researchers specified five modifications to the work environment that could theoretically have the most impact on health and employee potential – on the one hand health aspects such as healthy nutrition, mental balance and physical movement and on the other, environmental factors such as the natural interior design and suitable lighting. In this case the influence of circadian lighting adapted to the sequence of daylight was analysed.

Reseachers recorded an accuracy improvement of 12 per cent in an objective experiment. Additionally, the participants working in the office with the human-centric lighting found their total work performance to be 18 per cent better, 71 per cent found they had more energy, 76 per cent thought they were happier and 50 per cent healthier.

 

Tunable white lighting in the classroom: The new ROI is ROO

Throughout the past few years, we at LEDs Magazine have seen more solid-state lighting (SSL) product development targeted at educational environments. School officials, especially in the public-school arena, must manage strict budgets and plan strategically to obtain the best return on investment (ROI) possible, so the potential financial implications are important factors — first, the cost of premium equipment and installation, but then balanced against the possible payback due to energy efficiency initiatives and less maintenance. One consideration beyond the established cost reductions of SSL in institutional buildings such as schools is the possible impact of tunable white lighting in the classroom. Naturally, dimmability and other controls features such as granularity of color temperature can be customized to various classroom tasks and increase visual acuity. But what’s becoming even more appealing to educational administrators is the ability to influence less “visible” factors in the classroom, such as mood, behavior, and concentration. Strategies in Light, co-located with The LED Show and Lightspace California, will draw more attention to so-called human-centric lighting applications as this, also known as lighting for health and wellbeing. One such presentation, “Lighting for pupils…Tunable white lighting in the classroom and the new ROI,” by Tricia Foster of Acuity Brands Lighting and Catherine Hollenshead of Estes, McClure & Associates (EMA), will feature a case study on a Texas school district’s first-hand experience using tunable white lighting in several classrooms. Here the speakers give a glimpse into the new classroom experience. They will offer up additional details during SIL on how ROI has evolved into “return on objective” (ROO) in such installations. — Carrie Meadows

Tunable white lighting is the future of classroom lighting because of the positive impacts on mood, behavior, and concentration. In a time when schools are seeking every possible advantage to improve the learning environment, they cannot lose sight of the impact lighting and controls can have on learning. Lighting and controls need to be considered tools that are as critical as smartboards, tablets for students, and all the other modern-day teaching tactics that are being deployed in classrooms across the country.

Acuity Brands and EMA will discuss the installation of the tunable white solution in the Carrollton Farmers Branch Independent School District (ISD) where the ROI went beyond energy — showing what it took to bring the energy manager, the teachers, the parents, principal, and even the students along for the ride. In addition, the results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) Gateway Study are now public and we will show the results of this study based on the installation at CFB ISD.

Tunable white lighting and its potential impact on the K–12 learning environment has been the subject of a number of research studies, but not a lot of practical, in-the-classroom experience exists,” Foster points out. “Catherine and I had the opportunity to work with the school administration, teachers, and students to gain insight and feedback on just how effective lighting can be on student behavior and performance.”

“As part of our presentation, we Twill walk through deploying a tunable white system into the classroom,” adds Hollenshead. “We will review the return on investment from energy savings over the previous fluorescent lighting system, but also dig into the multiple benefits to the teachers and impact on students as they experience lighting that can be adjusted to mood, activity, time of day, and other factors.”

Lighting industry ‘must teach schools the value of good lighting’

Lighting professionals must join with educators to improve lighting in schools, Chris Boyce of Capita Symonds told LuxLive.

Better cooperation is needed to make use of government funding for primary and secondary education, Boyce said in a keynote speech.

Boyce urged lighting professionals to use their knowledge and skills to help architects and educators to make the right choices. He said: ‘We need the people who design the lighting in education to help us as architects to change the way light is given in education – that is my plea to you.’

He also called on schools to learn lessons from the way commercial offices and universities are lit.

Boyce warned of the dangers of installing low-energy lighting without understanding how it will be used. The drive by the government to standardise energy-efficiency and school designs could compromise the quality of school lighting due to a lack of evidence on the need for quality lighting, he  warned.

‘It’s my view that lighting will suffer,’ Boyce said, ‘and it’s the industry’s job to work with architects to persuade teachers that they need quality space and not just space.

‘Lighting contributes to educational outcomes. My request for the lighting industry is to challenge the normal education need by gathering the data to back up the need for it.’

Halogen lighting heads into the sunset while LEDs are on the rise

From Sept. 1 this year, almost all halogen lighting will be phased out in Europe to make way for more efficient and cost-effective solutions. This is the last of a number of European Union (EU) Eco-Design measures, which were first put into place in 2009 to bring the industry closer to meeting targets set out under the energy strategy for 2020.

The incandescent light bulb has existed for over 130 years; however, about 90% of the energy it produces is in the form of heat as opposed to light, making it hugely inefficient. That translates into 75% more energy used than LED alternatives. Therefore, the switch from incandescent to LED is a vital business decision, and in light of the impending halogen phase-out across the EUxbqtdzrbtvavsddwcdbsdvfcdx, it demands immediate attention.

The European Union has long been committed to fighting climate change and in 2009 it announced bold plans to reduce energy use by 20% by 2020. With 39% of a commercial property’s electricity consumed by lighting, according to the US Department of Energy, and 50% of lighting deemed highly inefficient, it’s easy to understand why this energy source has such an important role to play. What’s more, the Committee of Climate Change has reported that energy companies are predicted to drive up bills by 30% by 2030 in response to the European Commission’s drive for energy-efficient operations.

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Between 2009 and 2012, EU Eco-Design measures saw the gradual removal of clear incandescent lamps from the market, as well as those lamps previously defined as special purpose (incandescent rough service, high/low temperature, and clear glass decorative filament). The use of halogen directional mains‐voltage and low‐voltage lamps (GU10, PAR, R-type) was then outlawed in 2016.

The final deadline designed to bring the industry closer to meeting the energy strategy came into play on Sept. 1. This will see mains-voltage non-directional halogen lamps banned, marking the phasing out of almost all halogen lighting. Refrigerator and oven lamps, halogen capsules, linear R7s bulbs, and low-voltage halogen lamps such as MR16 will remain available.

According to the European Commission, in 2018 the switch to energy-efficient lamps will result in total annual energy savings that match the annual electricity consumption of the whole of Portugal (48.0 TWh of electricity). This means a savings of 15.2 million metric tonnes of CO2 emissions by 2025.

Replacing halogen with LED is not a new development. Many users have already benefited from upgrading their lighting. However, LEDs still only make up 10% of lighting systems globally due to the legacy of incandescent and halogen, leaving room for change. With that said, LED is predicted to become the predominant source of lighting over the next decade.

In addition to being significantly more energy efficient, LED lamps offer a considerably longer service life. The average lifespan of LED is said to be approximately 50,000 hr compared to incandescent (1000 hr), halogen (2000 hr), and compact fluorescent lamps (15,000 hr). So while many have bemoaned the cost of LEDs, given their lower energy consumption and longer lifetime, there is no debating that these lamps represent a smart investment.

LEDs have been criticized for limited diversity of color temperatures. Past LED lamps produced cold, white light that failed to mimic the warmth and ambience of halogen and incandescent alternatives.

Now, the latest leading LED solutions are capable of replicating the charm and aesthetic of traditional halogen lamps by offering a range of warm color temperatures to create soft, relaxed, and elegant atmospheres in residential or hospitality applications.

Newer-generation LED lamps also come with high-performance glare-control optics, improving the delivery of light and helping to increase productivity and wellness in offices. And leading ranges come with enhanced flexibility — a key consideration particularly for retail settings. Many lamps feature adjustable beam angles to provide high-quality light that draws attention to specific areas in stores to boost sales. They also allow for accommodating future changes to store layout and design trends.

The drive toward more energy-efficient lighting has been met with apprehension by some. But the latest LED developments promise to ensure that end users can still achieve the look and feel of halogen while realizing the long-term value that LED has to offer.

SIMON REED is general manager of the Global FMG business unit for Sylvania. His professional career extends across well-known telecommunications and lighting businessess, including Alcatel-Lucent and Eaton's former Cooper Lighting business. He joined Havells Sylvania in the UK in 2014 as vice president of sales & marketing  - EMEA and later became VP of the EMEA region for Feilo Sylvania after the parent, Shanghai Feilo Acoustics Co., Ltd. (FACs), acquired the business from Havells Holdings Limited. Sylvania is the lead brand of Feilo's Sylvania Lighting group, which provides consumer, professional, and architectural lighting products.

Prioritize photometrics in outdoor lighting retrofits

Too often, people involved in lighting retrofit projects make assumptions. One of the biggest is that a one-for-one replacement of an outdoor pole light will create an acceptable result. Unfortunately, this is not always straightforward.

In a new construction project, a photometric plan is typically drawn up. However, since many lighting contractors do not have the capability to handle photometric designs in-house, if they expect to replace fixtures on a one-for-one basis, they are unlikely to spend the time on photometrics. On those rare occasions they do incorporate the plan into a project, they rely heavily on lighting manufacturers to execute it for them. Lighting specifiers and installers are often pitched by LED lighting manufacturers claiming to provide this service as a value-add, but it can create delays with the project; or, depending on the experience level of the designer, photometrics can be rushed, resulting in a less-than-optimal design.

It’s well established that replacing a 400W metal-halide (MH) area light fixture with a 100–150W LED fixture will result in crisper and brighter illumination, so many contractors skip the photometric process and start installing as quickly as they can in order to move on to the next project. This mistake not only can negatively impact your bottom line but it can do the same to a customer’s overall satisfaction.

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Before diving in to how delivering photometric plans can both enhance your business and improve customer relationships, it is important to understand some of the basic elements of a photometric design.

Foundations of photometrics

At its basic level, a photometric design is a simulation of a lighting plan that can give the user a 2D and/or 3D view of the illumination provided by installing new LED lighting. It gives installers and specifiers the ability to determine what configuration of lighting fixtures will produce the best illumination for the outdoor application. The photometric design involves calculating both horizontal and vertical illuminance (brightness). Think of the horizontal measurement as the amount of light that lands on a horizontal surface, such as across the parking lot. The vertical measurement is the amount of light measured on a vertical surface such as a building wall. The measure of illuminance that we all know and use each day is called foot candles (mainly in the US) or lux (outside the US). One foot candle is defined as 1 lm/ft2.

Other important elements of a proper photometric design include BUG ratings, foot-candle ratios, optics, CCT, tilt, orientation, and roll.

FIG. 1. The diagram above represents the various beam distributions that can be achieved by incorporating specialized optics into outdoor LED lighting designs during photometric planning. (Image credit: Deco Lighting.)

BUG stands for backlight, uplight, and glare. It is a rating system that is used to evaluate luminaire optical performance related to light trespass, sky glow, and high-angle brightness control (IES RP-20-14 Revised). This is especially important when you must take into account adjacent properties and light spilling over. Many municipal codes limit the amount of light that can spill over to the next property; if you avoid factoring this into your design, you may wind up re-installing the entire system, costing both you and your customer — perhaps municipal authorities — quite a bit of money.

One must be very careful with glare. If you are working on high mast poles, it is not much of an issue, but if the light source is located at a lower level, glare can be a major problem for pedestrians and drivers, especially if older customers frequent a parking lot, for instance. Remember, if your customer is unhappy because its customers are complaining, it will cost time and money to fix the problem. It may also cause you to lose future business from that customer.

Foot-candle ratios in outdoor parking lots usually refer to the max-to-min ratio. This indicates the proportion of the maximum foot-candle level to the minimum foot-candle level. 15:1 is the IES standard and if you go above that, the result is an unevenly-lit parking lot. In most cases, it is not feasible to install additional poles, leaving lighting designers stuck with the inherited layout. If the lot is a simple open rectangle, you probably will not encounter many problems using LED fixtures to achieve this 15:1 ratio. However, if the lot is oddly shaped and/or has obstructions, you will need to utilize one of the most important features of LED lighting — optics. Optics are lenses that direct LED light to achieve specific beam distribution patterns at particular angles. Fig. 1 shows examples of different LED optics patterns.

We recently completed a project for an REIT that owns a shopping center. The company’s tenant was insisting on higher foot-candle levels in order to renew the lease. While it would have been easy to just increase the foot-candle levels, we brought to the customer’s attention that it also had a lot of shadowing and replacing fixtures one for one would not resolve that issue. Additionally, we explained that the lighting at the entrance to the center was not designed correctly. After going through a few rounds of photometric plans, we were able to create a parking lot lighting plan that not only met the lease and REIT customers’ foot-candle requirements but virtually eliminated shadows and dark spots, improving the lot entrance dramatically (Fig. 2). Both the REIT client and its tenant were so happy with the outcome that we are now working on a portfolio of other shopping center projects for the same client.

Another tactic that lighting designers employ to aid in keeping the optimal max-to-min ratio for uniform illumination is tilt, orientation, and roll.

If an LED fixture is facing down at the ground, there is zero-degree tilt. We can then adjust it so the fixture is anywhere between 0–180°. But we need to be mindful with tilt. Many municipalities also regulate the amount of light traveling up. This is known as the dark sky movement. The premise is that activists and municipal authorities want to minimize light pollution and do not want light traveling up at all. Lighting professionals should first check to see if there are any local regulations that may apply to the project they are working on. If there are none, tilting an LED fixture may be the only way to create more uniformity on the lot without adding more poles.

FIG. 2. The before and after photos show the previous outdoor lighting (top) versus a properly placed LED luminaire layout (bottom) achieved using proper photometrics, which resulted in fewer shadowy areas and a more uniformly-lit parking lot.

Orientation refers to the horizontal movement of the LED fixture on the pole. If we use a compass as an example, there are 360°. We can move the fixture anywhere within the 360° to maximize the lighting pattern.

Roll is similar to tilt, but instead of the fixture moving straight up or down, the fixture may be turned side to side with one edge going up and the other edge going down. So in theory, the fixture can be positioned at 90°. Once again, this affects Dark Sky standards, so we need to be precise in planning and practice. Unless a proper photometric analysis is performed, you will be unable to optimize the layout and design for the project.

Let’s look at a case study as an example. For an outdoor LED lighting project in Tennessee, our team had a max-to-min ratio of 30:1 by just replacing fixtures one for one, using the same position as the current fixtures. When we adjusted the layout using tilt and orientation changes, we were able to bring the ratio down to 15:1, which is a dramatic improvement.

Consider color quality and efficacy

There are some other lighting characteristics and metrics that impact light quality and luminaire performance: CCT, CRI, and efficacy.

Correlated color temperature (CCT) has been a controversial topic in outdoor LED lightingbsrtsvxrcvudvdsvtadazcatscczcexewf. CCT describes the color appearance of white light defined in degrees Kelvin. A simple way to look at CCT is the difference between warm and cool. Warm generally means yellowish and cool tends to be bluish white light. The lower range (e.g., 2700K) is warm and the higher range (e.g., 5000K) is cool.

In outdoor lighting, the conventional wisdom has been to implement fixtures that output light at a cool, 5000K+ CCT. The perception of the user is that a 5000K light source will seem brighter and crisper versus a warmer CCT. Therefore, the outdoor environment will be more visible, as would any occupants. But as stated, recently there has been quite a bit of controversy over using higher CCT in outdoor LED lighting. There has been coverage in the popular press about the negative health effects that higher-CCT light may have on people and the environment, including a Fast Company story from August 2018.

In 2016, the American Medical Association (AMA) published an article about this very subject (see initial news coverage by LEDs Magazine). In response to the guidance by the AMA against the use of high-CCT LED lights, cities such as Phoenix, AZ; Lake Worth, FL; and 25 towns in Connecticut are now opting for street lamps with lower color temperatures, meaning less blue light emission. The AMA and the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) met earlier this year at Strategies in Light to further debate and discuss these contentious outdoor lighting concerns, but thus far they have been unable to come to a mutual agreement on further guidance.

Many researchers are studying the effects of blue-rich light. Many in the lighting world are waiting for IES to take a firm stand on this. My suspicion is that the trend will be moving toward warmer CCT in the future, whether the research is conclusive or not.

To add more complexity to the color discussion, color rendering index (CRI) is a quantitative measure of the ability of a light source to reveal the colors of various objects faithfully in comparison with an ideal or natural light source. Light sources with a high CRI are desirable in color-critical applications, such as neonatal care, art restoration, and high-end retail environments. For outdoor lighting, CRI does not play much of a critical role. Most LED outdoor luminaires have a CRI of 70 or better, which is fine for illuminating a general-use parking lot, for instance. The exception to this is a lot that displays items where color is very important, such as an automotive dealership. In this scenario, there may be a need to show off vibrant colors and the customer and designer may opt for a higher CRI.

The disadvantage of a higher-CRI fixture is that the efficacy (lumens per watt) decreases. You can be losing 20% or more of the light level to achieve a higher CRI and the energy consumption is higher. Is this tradeoff worthwhile? That depends on the project’s objectives and customer preference. We would want to see a photometric study with both high CRI and normal CRI in this situation so that we can evaluate the differences and present the options to the customer.

When a luminaire has higher efficacy, it consumes less energy and saves the customer more money on energy bills while achieving adequate light levels. When comparing light fixtures side by side, as long as you can achieve your goals for uniformity and light levels, the customer will be better off using an LED fixture with higher efficacy. In the short term, the fixture may be more expensive; therefore, it may be harder to sell the project.

Upfront cost is the dilemma many of us face when selling LED technology. Showing the customer the results of a before and after comparison on projects where LED retrofits were properly planned out with photometrics, designed for the intended use, and properly installed can be very persuasive. Providing information on payback from energy savings may also help to move the needle. Attention to these details will help to build better business relationships and ensure successful outdoor LED lighting projects.

DAVID ETZLER, LEED GA, president of SIB Lighting, manages the firm’s strategy and growth, including strategic partnerships with property management firms and building owners all across the country. He came to SIB Lighting through the acquisition of his company, HOA Energy Advisors, in May of 2015. HOA Energy helps commercial properties save money on their energy bills through lighting and lighting control systems. Prior to HOA Energy, Etzler founded and owned BusinessEvents, LLC, an event production and management company focused on the energy market. BusinessEvents produced energy conferences, tradeshows and special events all over the world.

Focus shifts from lumens to color

We always look forward to bringing our audience webcasts that educate them on industry standards, design challenges, and product and application development guidance. But this week’s webcast was one I particularly anticipated because it has the potential to change how the solid-state lighting (SSL) industry utilizes test and measurement guidance, and effectively end the notion that the lumen is the only light characteristic that matters with regard to LED lifetime performance.

I’m talking about the presentation by Dr. Eric Bretschneider, an established consultant in the LED and lighting space, where he addressed a new analytical model to predict chromaticity shift in LEDs and SSL products.

Why is chromaticity shift important?

“This is something the industry has been interested in. With the long life of LED products and the focus on lumen maintenance, the products are lasting long enough that people are starting to see these chromaticity shifts, and it’s been a real problem,” said Bretschneider. And with good reason.

As Bretschneider presented an example of current lifetime test methodology on a sample SSL product (see below), he said, “Here’s why it’s important… If you look at this product in the first 6000 hours, it looks really great. If you just look at this, you say, ‘This is fantastic; I’ve got no color shift. This is going to last forever.’ The real problem is what happens after that.” The initial period during which Δu’v’ was constant was referred to as “incubation.”

Showing the abrupt upward curve representing change in Δu’v’ with a shift of ~0.007 over the time period, Bretschneider explained, “[W]e’ve got no change… all of a sudden you see it takes off and it never looks back” — what he referred to as “emergence,” the period during which Δu’v’ increases as approximately a linear function of time.

Image credit: DOE Gateway Demonstrations: Color Maintenance of  LEDs in Laboratory and Field Applications.

So you may ask, why can’t we rely solely on lumen maintenance to determine failure rate going forward? Bretschneider said that the color shift emerges after the period over which lumen maintenance would typically already be measured. However, critical chromaticity shift (which is considered a failure) may happen long before the actual lumen maintenance failure of a product.

So essentially, you are either stuck with performing a much more extensive test (much longer than the LM-80 test of 6000 hours, for instance)…or you can learn how to use a predictive model to be proactive in determining color shift. This could reduce a lot of customer dissatisfaction by setting realistic expectations on the light quality and maintenance timeline for installed fixtures.

A self-proclaimed math nerd, Bretschneider goes into considerably more detail about the presently available methods, and provides insight on how a model he called “differential chromaticity analysis” (DCA) can be used to build a table of predictive data with time steps, that helps those who are more math averse. There is so much more to glean from his presentation than I can convey here.

You can register and view this webcast on demand to get the full details on predicting chromaticity shift in SSL products.

Global LED Indoor Commercial Lighting Market Will Reach USD 15.87 Billion in 2018, Says LEDinside.

According to the latest report from LEDinside, a division of the market research firm TrendForce, 2018 Commercial Lighting, Smart Lighting and Panel Light Market Report, the global LED indoor commercial lighting market will reach USD 15.87 billion in 2018, accounting for 42% of the global LED lighting production value, moreover, the global LED commercial lighting is estimated to achieve CAGR of 3% during 2018-2021, growing slower than previous years, mainly resulting from the price decrease of LED lighting products and the reduction in market installation.

Commercial intelligent lighting will takes up 33.5% of the global intelligent lighting market scale in 2018, reaching USD 2.53 billion. Digitalization can bring more new business models and value growth opportunities, therefore commercial lighting is the largest application of intelligent lighting at present, It is expected that the global intelligent lighting market will keep growing in next few years, reaching USD 13.4 billion by 2020.

What is the Internet of Things (IoT)? Meaning & Definition

www.businessinsider.com

You've likely heard the phrase "Internet of Things" — or IoT — at some point, but you might also be scratching your head figuring out what it is or what it means.

What is the Internet of Things?

The Internet of Things, commonly abbreviated as IoT, refers to the connection of devices (other than typical fare such as computers and smartphones) to the Internet. Cars, kitchen appliances, and even heart monitors can all be connected through the IoT. And as the Internet of Things grows in the next few years, more devices will join that list.

We've compiled a beginner's guide of IoT terms and questions to help you navigate the increasingly connected world.

What is an Internet of Things device?

Any stand-alone internet-connected device that can be monitored and/or controlled from a remote location is considered an IoT device. With more smaller, more powerful chips, almost all products can be an Internet of Things devices.

What is the Internet of Things ecosystem?

All the components that enable businesses, governments, and consumers to connect to their IoT devices, including remotes, dashboards, networks, gateways, analytics, data storage, and security is part of the Internet of Things ecosystem.

Other Internet of Things Terms & Definitions:

  • Entity: Includes businesses, governments, and consumers.

  • Physical layer: The hardware that makes an IoT device, including sensors and networking gear.

  • Network layer: Responsible for transmitting the data collected by the physical layer to different devices.

  • Application layer: This includes the protocols and interfaces that devices use to identify and communicate with each other.

  • Remotes: Enable entities that utilize IoT devicesto connect with and control them using a dashboard, such as a mobile application. They include smartphones, tablets, PCs, smartwatches, connected TVs, and nontraditional remotes.

  • Dashboard: Displays information about the IoT ecosystem to users and enables them to control their IoT ecosystem. It is generally housed on a remote.

  • Analytics: Software systems that analyze the data generated by IoT devices. The analysis can be used for a variety of scenarios, such as predictive maintenance.

  • Data storage: Where data from IoT devices is stored.

  • Networks: The internet communication layer that enables the entity to communicate with their device, and sometimes enables devices to communicate with each other.

IoT Predictions, Trends, and Market

BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service, expects there will be more than 24 billion IoT devices on Earth by 2020. That's approximately four devices for every human being on the planet.

And as we approach that point, $6 billion will flow into IoT solutions, including application development, device hardware, system integration, data storage, security, and connectivity. But that will be money well spent, as those investments will generate $13 trillion by 2025.

Who will reap these benefits? There are three major entities that will use IoT ecosystems: consumers, governments, and businesses. For more detail, see the Industries section below.

What are the industries affected by IoT?

While we can expect IoT to affect every industry one way or another, there are several environments within the three groups of consumers, governments, and ecosystems will benefit the greatest from the IoT. These include:

What are the major IoT Companies?

There are literally hundreds of companies linked to the Internet of Things, and the list should only expand in the coming years. Here are some of the major players that have stood out in the IoT to this point:

  • Microsoft (MSFT)

  • Amazon (AMZN)

  • Google (GOOGL)

  • IBM (IBM)

  • Cisco (CSCO)

  • Verizon (VZ)

  • AT&T (T)

  • GE (GE)

  • Fitbit (FIT)

  • Garmin (GRMN)

  • Honeywell (HON)

  • BlackRock (BLK)

What are IoT Platforms?

One IoT device connects to another to transmit information using Internet transfer protocols. IoT platforms serve as the bridge between the devices' sensors and the data networks.

The following are some of the top IoT platforms on the market today:

  • Amazon Web Services

  • Microsoft Azure

  • ThingWorx IoT Platform

  • IBM's Watson

  • Cisco IoT Cloud Connect

  • Salesforce IoT Cloud

  • Oracle Integrated Cloud

  • GE Predix

IoT Security & Privacy

As devices become more connected thanks to the IoT, security and privacy have become the primary concern among consumers and businesses. But it's not slowing IoT adoption; in fact, US smart speaker adoption has grown 54% from December 2017 to February 2018, according to a 2018 comScore survey.

However as more connected devices pop up around the globe, cyber attacks are also a growing threat. Hackers could penetrate connected cars, critical infrastructure, and even people's homes. As a result, several tech companies are focusing on cyber security in order to secure the privacy and safety of all this data.

More to Learn

The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing rapidly as companies around the world connect thousands of devices every day. But behind those devices, there's a sector worth hundreds of billions of dollars supporting the IoT.

Platforms are the glue that holds the IoT together, allowing users to take full advantage of the disruptive potential of connected devices. These platforms allow the IoT to achieve its transformational potential, letting businesses manage devices, analyze data, and automate the workflow.

In a new report, Business Insider Intelligence examines the evolving IoT platform ecosystem. We size the market and identify the primary growth drivers that will power the IoT platform space in the next five years. And we profile many of the top IoT platforms, discussing key trends in the platform industry like platform consolidation.

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • The IoT platforms market is set to expand rapidly in the years to come, with current leading platforms expanding and others entering the space.

  • We define the key categories into which IoT platforms fall: building block open platforms, closed high-end platforms, and product management platforms.

  • We highlight the ways platforms can help companies reach the full five stage potential of the IoT.

  1. In full, the report:

    • Explains the coming growth of the IoT platforms.

    • Profiles a number of leading platforms.

    • Highlights the central role platforms play in the IoT.

    • Looks to the future of the IoT platforms market.

Capitalize on the intersection of commercial lighting and IoT (MAGAZINE)

Published on: Sep 12, 2018

By Chuck Piccirillo
Osram Digital Systems

As the IoT establishes itself as the next adaptation in hardware and software applications, CHUCK PICCIRILLO outlines how enabling technology and lighting providers must shift to a new conceptual and development model to ensure their businesses will thrive in the connected spaces market.

The Internet of Things (IoT) and lighting have been living in separate worlds until very recently. Over the past decade, indoor lighting has evolved from traditional incandescent and fluorescent technology into solid-state lighting (SSL) and subsequently connected lighting management systems. Simultaneously, the IoT has established itself as the next technology revolution destined to create a plethora of smart applications that will change the way we work, play, and live. As the number of connected devices reaches an all-time high, these two worlds are coming together in a way that is mutually beneficial.

Lighting is ubiquitous — it’s in every space within a building. It is the perfect conduit for collecting information on what is happening in a building at any given time, because it is ideally located in the space and is connected to a power source. Sensors embedded in luminaires transform light points into data nodes on the lighting network, creating the enabling technology infrastructure for smart building applications and the IoT. As more emphasis is placed on connected spaces, an increasing number of use cases become possible.

This opportunity spawns several questions. What is driving the adoption of smart lighting and IoT? What will the ecosystem look like that moves this market forward? What factors should be considered when choosing a networked lighting control system, and what are the first steps to get started?Smart lighting and the IoT ecosystem

A complete end-to-end IoT solution requires a lot of capabilities, and no one entity can provide this on its own. In reality, IoT solutions will be based on the latest innovations and technologies as well as partnerships and alliances, where each organization contributes its own area of expertise to form a complete solution.

Partnerships are emerging between lighting companies and other technology-based companies — many of which were unlikely before this latest technology revolution. Although still in its infancy, many lighting companies are teaming up with traditional IT organizations, software service providers, and, in many cases, other lighting companies to tackle new and innovative applications.

For example, lighting companies need a cloud infrastructure to store data collected about the space and are forming partnerships with companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Google, etc., which can provide services that connect lighting networks to the cloud.

This begs the question: What do you do with the information that is coming from the lighting network? Software-as-a-service (SaaS) companies are taking information to produce the applications and analytics that are needed for particular smart IoT use cases. Since lighting is everywhere, each light point can provide very accurate data about a specific space within a building and this level of accuracy enhances the analytics capability that SaaS applications require. They can gain granular insights from lighting system data about what is happening in the space.

“Coopetition” in the market is increasing. Lighting manufacturers are seeking out other lighting manufacturers to go to market together with solutions that are mutually beneficial. In this new blended world, previous competitors are now seeing the value of combining products and expertise.

Drivers for adoption of smart lighting

As previously mentioned, lighting is ubiquitous and well-suited for collecting information about activities taking place in a building at any given time. With this as its backdrop, there are other major factors leading to the adoption of smart lighting systems.

Energy and operational savings. According to IBM, the day-to-day operation of a building represents more than 70% of the total cost of that building over its life­span — this includes things like electricity, heating and cooling, water, etc. The immediate impact of IoT in commercial buildings is to lower operational costs, particularly in the form of energy savings. And many building codes, especially in the United States, are being rewritten to address these new cost reduction requirements, another factor driving adoption.

Building efficiencies. By creating a digital version of a building and its internal operations including systems and occupant activities, you can visualize what happens in the building on a day-to-day basis and use those insights to make better decisions. These reports enable facility executives to improve efficiencies while they centrally manage systems in the building or group of buildings.

Occupant health and wellbeing. There has been a shift in recent years toward occupant health and wellbeing and the impact that factors like lighting and room temperature have on productivity and alertness levels. With this in mind, many companies are piloting applications that test how these factors impact their employees’ experiences while at work.

Considerations for IoT deployment

Selecting an infrastructure that will support IoT can be an overwhelming task. There are still many unknowns about what the exact requirements will be, and no one wants to make an investment mistake. However, there a few key considerations when choosing an intelligent lighting system infrastructure as a platform for IoT, which can help future-proof the system.

Be prepared to scale. Choose a software-based, scalable infrastructure that can grow in size and scope, protecting and extending the value of your investment. Software is easy and cost effective to upgrade, and you will not need to rip out and replace expensive hardware as you grow or adjust your space.

Stay flexible and agile. Choose an infrastructure that not only supports change but handles it quickly. Most office space is reconfigured regularly to accommodate employee movement and space adjustments. Chances are you will need to adjust lighting and other smart building applications. You’ll want to manage luminaires and control zones quickly with a few mouse clicks and without rewiring or moving fixtures. And individual addressability of each luminaire will enable you to capture the granular data needed for applications such as predictive maintenance.

Go wireless. Wireless technology has improved drastically over the past five years and it will continue to improve moving forward. In the not-so-distant future, virtually everything will communicate wirelessly including emerging IoT applications that will make your smart building even smarter, so be prepared. The initial technical challenges of deploying wireless have been overcome and now wireless is the connectivity of choice because it costs less to install, is more flexible in retrofit spaces than hard-wired systems, and can be deployed quickly.

Stick with non-proprietary technology. A standards-based, non-proprietary platform is key to enabling the variety and number of potential IoT applications that will surface, including those from startups. Access to a broad ecosystem fundamentally conflicts with a proprietary platform strategy. You don’t want your options to be limited as you roll out specific IoT applications. Your system should have the ability to connect to a range of devices from multiple manufacturers. Pick a solution that allows you to select the right hardware for the space, without being beholden to a specific manufacturer.

The platform needs to connect to the cloud for data storage and SaaS-based applications such as space utilization, asset tracking, conference room and desk bookings, and more. Open, cloud-connected platforms enable more developers to deliver more innovative apps quickly and cost-effectively.

Streamline the user experience. Choose a system that is easy-to-use for both the facility manager and occupants. Additional features and functionality should not translate to additional complexity for facility managers and their operations team. As smart systems evolve, facility managers will be putting more control of the environment into the hands of occupants to support their preferences in their workspaces. A simple user experience is crucial to making the facility team’s tasks manageable.

Put IoT potential to work

IoT brings smart lighting to the next level. Think of it as smart lighting on steroids. While smart lighting brings efficiencies and automation to the lighting system, the addition of IoT tells a broader story about the space, the occupants, and the building itself.

Like any new technology wave, there will be those who take a cautious, slow-roll approach, while early adopters want it deployed everywhere as soon as possible. As the industry grows and matures, more pilots are being deployed to ensure the products of all suppliers involved in an IoT system are compatible for seamless operation.

It depends on the use case, but some pilots can run in as few as two weeks, while a more typical pilot period lasts approximately six months, with many choosing a phased approach versus a full deployment. Once deployed, and depending upon the type of application, the return on investment may be immediate or not too far off in the future.

As the IoT and smart lighting worlds continue to merge, the ecosystem of lighting manufacturers and software providers will continue to expand, bringing unique applications to market that have yet to be imagined. The promise of a new intelligent world is a reality and it starts with smart lighting.

CHUCK PICCIRILLO is head of product – Lighting Networks & Services for Osram. A 19-year veteran of the Osram organization, Piccirillo has served in engineering roles, both managing projects and delivering manufacturing solutions, and later moved into product marketing and business development roles with Osram. He participated in a pre-engineering program with Saint Bonaventure University, received a BS in chemical engineering from Clarkson University, and completed an MBA program with a focus on high tech at the D'Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University. Piccirillo is a member of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and is Lighting Certified.

Lighten your retail overheads with energy-efficient lighting

For retail businesses, installing the right lights can reduce energy costs by up to 15 per cent

In today’s competitive retail environment, effective lighting is not only a customer expectation, but essential for achieving ‘the right look’ for a retail outlet.

While most retailers recognise the importance of lighting in providing a pleasant shopping and working environment, few merchandisers realise that it’s possible to reduce up to 15 per cent off their energy costs, by installing the right lighting technology.

The retail industry often demands bright, flattering lighting to draw customers and maximize sales but this is seldom very energy-efficient.  Yet there are substantial savings to be made on both the shop floor and in the back office, with many simple and inexpensive ways to reduce the energy consumption and costs associated with high-impact lighting without compromising profits.

Saving energy in a retail business is one of the simplest ways to directly increase margins without the need to grow sales—in fact, a 20 per cent cut in energy costs can represent the same bottom line benefit as a 5 per cent increase in sales, making energy-saving the new profit centre for retail businesses.

It’s estimated that a 20 per cent saving in retail energy costs is achievable nationally in the UK, totalling some £340 million per year across the sector.  And whilst energy costs may be only a small percentage of turnover, they represent a much larger proportion of profit.

By focusing on easily actionable measuresyou’ll be amazed at how simple actions can save energy, cut costs and increase productivity with the quickest payback.

Many energy-saving opportunities are within the control of staff and easily achievable at little to no-cost, which is an ideal way of making energy conservation part of a collaborative staff effort.

Low-to-no cost quick wins

Lighting accounts for anything from 15% to 70% of your total energy costs, depending on the type of store, but there are several quick-fixes you can implement to enhance your energy efficiency and reduce your energy spend:

  • Install energy-efficient lights—LED lights and compact fluorescent products use 80 per cent less electricity than conventional light bulbs

  • Use movement detectors, time switches and daylight sensors

  • Encourage staff to switch lights off when they’re not needed

Lighting’s role in the retail environment

Beyond its basic illumination function, a well-designed lighting scheme must satisfy varied business needs in the retail environment:

  • Sets the mood and atmosphere of the store so that customers will want to enter

  • Directs the customers’attention to the merchandise and stimulates impulse buying

  • Draws attention to the shop and its displays

  • Helps to enhance the store’s image

  • Improves the use of space

From the perspective of the owners and staff of a retail outlet, a lighting scheme should:

  • Provide adequate light to enable transactions to be completed efficiently, leading to fewer errors

  • Provide favourable working conditions to minimise eye fatigue and general tiredness

  • Help to create the brand image of a store or chain of stores

  • Convey an inviting atmosphere within the store

  • Provide an effective deterrent against crime

Selecting energy-efficient lighting

With the vast range of lighting sources, designs and controls now available, modern lighting techniques present abundant energy-saving opportunities, whilst achieving a greatly enhanced level of illumination and visual appeal at minimum cost.

Making the switch to LEDs

Lighting accounts for about 20% of all electricity generated in the UK, but with most current lighting systems still reliant on inefficient light sources, moving to low-energy lighting such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) has never been more critical in energy-saving initiatives.

Install low energy lighting

Originally developed for use in electronics, LEDs have become the light source of choice, providing illumination at a fraction of the cost of legacy sources.  LEDs have the highest efficacy and lamp life of all lighting types, are easy to control and have no warm-up period.

They also provide superior colour and contrast, essential in helping to generate sales, particularly in fashion retail where the visual appearance of merchandise is critical, and in food retailing, where produce needs to look appealing.

LED fittings satisfy the demand for superior:

  • Cost, energy and carbon savings

  • Display illumination levels

  • Contrast and highlighting

  • Health and wellbeing

  • High efficacy ratings

  • Glare suppression

  • Colour rendering

LED cost benefits

In addition to providing direct energy savings, LEDs generate further cost savings from:

  • Reduced heat gain: LEDs produce very little waste heat compared to conventional sources, reducing the need for additional cooling on warm days

  • Longer lamp lifespan: this equates to lower and less frequent maintenance costs

  • Better controllability: through dimming and instantaneous switch on and off

Boost your energy-efficiency—and bottom line

There are varied other ways to bring your business energy bills down, by introducing energy-efficient best practices into your store without compromising service levels or health and safety concerns.

“Switch off” policy

Involve staff and increase awareness

  • Involve staff at all levels in savings efforts by encouraging them to turn off light switches

  • Clearly label light switches to help employees know which ones they can turn off

  • Switch off lights in unoccupied areas

Maintenance

Without regular maintenance, light levels can fall by at least 30% in 2-3 years

Establishing a basic lighting maintenance programme can reduce costs by up to 15 per cent while improving in-store appearance:

  • Replace old, dim lamps, and keep controls in good working order by ensuring timers are set to match trading hours

  • Ensure windows, skylights, light fittings and occupancy sensors are kept clean

Refurbishment

Design for adequate, but not excessive, levels of light

Specific display items that require high light levels will benefit from local task lighting, rather than illuminating the whole store to a high level.

Invest in sensors

Occupancy sensors

Installing an occupancy sensor with a photocell override to give the option of keeping lights off on bright days can achieve savings of up to 50% on lighting costs.  These automatically turn lights on when a room is occupied and turn them off after a period of vacancy.

Daylight sensors

Light sensors or ‘photocells’ can be used to dim or turn off artificial lighting when there’s sufficient natural daylight.  As daylight hours vary throughout the year, sensors help to provide closer control and thus, substantial savings and often pay back their costs in less than a year.

Both types of control are sometimes combined with time switches.

Simple energy solutions with a big payoff

Combined, these relatively simple solutions help you save money, increase your staff productivity, and reduce your carbon footprint—all of which enhances your Triple D bottom line.

Lighting the way to a cleaner, healthier, smarter future (MAGAZINE)

LEDs have delivered amazing energy savings, but CHRISTINA HALFPENNY explains the DesignLights Consortium view that even bigger SSL-centric savings will come with greater penetration, the exploration of new applications, and the move to networked lighting controls.

The rapid evolution of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over the past decade — a phenomenon fueled by advances both in technology and public policy — has transformed the world lighting market and catalyzed a path to huge energy savings. According to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) most recent report on LED adoption in the US, use of the technology delivered energy savings of nearly 470 trillion BTU in 2016 and reduced energy bills by approximately $4.7 billion. A relative novelty less than ten years ago, LEDs now dominate the residential lighting market and are making steady progress in commercial and industrial applications — with commercial market penetration increasing from less than 1% in 2012 to just under 13% today. By 2035, the DOE predicts LED lamps and luminaires will constitute 86% of all lighting products in the US — saving electricity equal to the total consumed annually by 45 million US homes and reducing energy costs by nearly $52 billion.

Christina Halfpenny

Mission accomplished? Not quite

Like many new technologies that burst onto the scene, LEDs almost instantly eclipsed the benefits their predecessors delivered. But as impressive as these gains are, they scratch the surface of the technology’s full capabilities. LEDs are at a pivotal crossroads, with innovations underway and on the near-horizon promising to greatly multiply potential energy and cost savings, while improving wellbeing and quality of life and providing a practical route to a smart building future.

At the DesignLights Consortium’s (DLC) Stakeholder Meeting in July, more than 250 efficiency program managers, utility contractors, solid-state lighting (SSL) manufacturers, testing laboratory staff, lighting designers, researchers, and others discussed the data, perspectives, predictions, challenges, and opportunities embodied in the current wave of LED innovation that’s set to unlock the technology’s next tier of potential.

For starters, even as we look at the need to replace some first-generation LEDs, there are myriad businesses and institutions across the country that haven’t yet adopted the technology at all. The industry has made much progress bringing high-performance lighting to market, but LED saturation in the commercial and industrial sector is still far off. At less than 13% market penetration, the commercial lighting market remains ripe with opportunity for energy savings — particularly in indoor lighting — and opportunities abound to incentivize greater adoption.

It’s useful to step back and consider why this matters at this moment in time. At our conference in Boston, Mayor Martin Walsh’s director of energy policy and programs Brad Swing told attendees that every energy decision the city makes is aimed at advancing Boston’s target to be carbon neutral by 2050. Boston is hardly alone in its quest to rein in the causes of climate change. It joins New York, Washington, Minneapolis, Boulder, San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Toronto, Vancouver, and other international cities on the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance seeking to cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 80–100% by 2050. In addition, some 2700 leaders of US cities, states, and businesses have signed on to America’s Pledge, vowing to honor the Paris Agreement’s goal of reducing GHG emissions to ensure the global average temperature increase is less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels.

As they are the fastest way to reduce energy consumed by buildings, LEDs are truly low-hanging fruit in the battle against climate change. With the technology ready and waiting to take advantage of remaining savings opportunities in the commercial space, LEDs are poised to change our energy load nationwide, reducing the peak and thereby the need to utilize not only more electricity but electricity generated by our dirtiest, carbon-emitting power plants.

At the July DesignLights Consortium Stakeholder Meeting and Conference held in Boston, MA, speakers and attendees representing key organizations and groups such as utilities, municipal and federal government authorities, energy-efficiency programs, lighting manufacturers, and ighting designers learned how DLC efforts will be shaped by market drivers and high-value applications.

While LEDs alone have certainly revolutionized the lighting sector, a new report prepared for the DLC by Energy Futures Group (EFG) of Vermont illustrates that adding networked lighting controls (NLCs) to the LED equation is the real game-changer. The EFG study found that adding NLCs to LED installations boosts energy savings by an average of 47% beyond savings from LEDs alone. This savings potential is equivalent over five years to 75 terawatt hours (tWh) of electricity — about 17 times greater than the 4.5 tWh annual output of the Hoover Dam.

In addition to tremendous energy-saving potential, NLCs promise a suite of non-lighting benefits such as greater personal comfort, better office space utilization, and enhanced workplace security. With sensors embedded in ceiling LED luminaires, for example, lighting can be the pathway to connected, “smart” buildings that enable employees to find and reserve vacant workstations and meeting rooms from a phone app, while employers and building managers can observe areas that are unoccupied at any given hour or day and correspondingly turn down heat, air conditioning, and lighting.

Unfortunately, widespread market penetration of NLCs isn’t likely to occur organically, due to their complicated nature, under-trained contractors, poorly understood benefits, and limited utility support. Meanwhile, continued installation of LEDs without controls hamstrings the technology’s vast promise for optimizing building performance, enhancing quality, and building a platform to the connected building future.

The EFG report found that with aggressive utility support and promotion, however, savings possible from NLCs by 2035 could be more than twice what’s expected to be realized under current utility promotion scenarios. It’s encouraging that utilities were among those voicing support for pushing the NLCs envelope at the recent DLC Stakeholder Meeting. Robust promotion of NLCs leading to significant market uptake can wring several additional years of savings out of current utility efficiency programs. For its part, the DLC has recently rolled out a new set of technical requirements for NLCs and developed installer training and a savings calculator designed to support utilities and the industry in bringing this technology mainstream.

The DLC’s advocacy for NLCs is consistent with our growing emphasis on controlling and enhancing the quality of light — something that will be evident in the “5.0” version of our Qualified Products List (QPL) specifications that will be out for comment January 2019, with a target effective date of January 2020. While product efficacy has taken center stage since issuance of our first specifications in 2009, this revision will give considerable weight to quality of light, while continuing to support products that accelerate broad-scale energy savings. Research tells us that quality of light affects people in profound ways — from productivity, performance, and safety to health, wellbeing, and mood. Yet, in our drive to save energy (and energy dollars), the industry as a whole has sometimes forgotten what lighting is really for: enabling people to see, perform necessary tasks, and feel comfort.

I saw this firsthand on a recent visit to my children’s pediatrician, when the conversation turned from immunization schedules to lighting. Glare from newly-installed LEDs in the exam room was causing physical stress to the staff working under them all day, the doctor and nurse lamented. And it was anything but soothing to small, young patients lining up for throat cultures, tetanus shots, and other medical procedures. Yes, they were saving electricity but at the expense of their core business function: comforting and healing sick children.

While that experience is anecdotal, it reflects an unintended byproduct of high-performance lighting that is not uncommon. Although no one wants to run back the clock to the inefficient pre-LED era, performance standards for LEDs are ripe for tweaking — as is the often the case after speedy and pervasive adoption of any new technology. What’s more, incentivizing better quality of light is not at odds with energy efficiency. It’s just the opposite, as a matter of fact, since better light quality will result in greater adoption of LEDs, translating into more savings.

Paying closer attention to quality of light in product selection and application is not just good for humans. Controlling for glare, flicker, and other aspects can mitigate the negative impacts outdoor lighting has on animals, birds, and insects — including its ability to disrupt reproduction, frustrate pollination, and alter migration.

For Homo sapiens, it’s increasingly clear that quality of light is a serious concern. As Kelly Seeger, technical policy manager at Signify (formerly Philips Lighting) in Burlington, MA, noted at the DLC’s July conference, “Health is the new sustainability,” and smart lighting is an enabler for healthy buildings. Under a newly-emerging paradigm, quality of light is not just about vision but is also critically important for supporting human beings’ natural circadian rhythms, encouraging morning alertness and evening relaxation.

Human-centric lighting often involves lighting controls that adjust for factors such as brightness and color, as well as sensing and adjusting for the amount of natural daylight entering a room. With the US Environmental Protection Agency reporting that Americans spend 90% of their time indoors on average, lighting that mirrors or mimics the daylight outside their office windows is known to boost productivity — as well as spirits!

Designing efficiency programs to strategically address the issues outlined here, as well as to maximize efficiency and performance of new products used by the country’s expanding indoor horticulture and agriculture industries, will be top of mind at the DLC for the foreseeable future. It’s an exciting and important time to be in the field of commercial lighting. Many intriguing challenges, opportunities, and collaborative efforts lie ahead as we put our collective shoulder to the wheel of possibilities for high-performance lighting to lead the way to a cleaner, smarter, healthier world.

Why Title 24 Compliance is Important

In recent years, utility companies have been hard at work to identify new ways to reduce both the cost and consumption of energy. State-mandated policies such as California’s Building Code, Title 24, have been instrumental for these initiatives.

Title 24 mandates that, by 2030, all new nonresidential construction must meet zero net energy (ZNE) requirements, which means a building cannot emit more energy than it produces. Additionally, Title 24 compliance may be required in existing non-residential buildings  in the event of certain lighting alterations. Every three years the California Energy Commission (CEC) updates Part 6 of Title 24 in order to continuously reduce energy consumption and stay on track with the state’s ZNE goals. View the free Title 24 compliance webinar here

Why Does Your Facility Need a Temperature Monitoring System?

It’s 1AM and the temperature in your cold storage facility is unexpectedly increasing. Despite the HVAC system’s night setting being enabled, the temperature continues to rise above the ideal range for preservation of inventory quality and freshness. A few hours pass before an employee notices the temperature abnormality.

As a result of the temperature change, the inventory in the impacted area is deemed useless. In addition to the loss of goods, the problem within the HVAC system itself has to be diagnosed and then fixed. The unforeseen expenses of this incident cut into cash reserves and may even negatively impact profits.

Even though the HVAC glitch eventually gets resolved, a question still lingers whether or not this situation will happen again. What if there were a simple way to check the real-time temperature and relative humidity levels in your facility from a mobile device?

Sense, an IoT and smart sensor-based environmental monitoring application, tracks, reports and verifies temperature and relative humidity to create a smarter facility. Designed for the cold and ambient manufacturing, food production and warehousing facilities, Sense provides live data updates, detailed analysis of past and present temperature and relative humidity readings, and the ability to monitor your facility remotely with its mobile application for smartphones and tablets.

The Sense mobile application communicates with easy-to-mount Temperature and Relative Humidity (TRH) sensors that require minimal configuration and operate wirelessly. Once these smart sensors are placed throughout your facility, Sense will start to populate your dashboard with real-time data and analysis.

Sense enables facility managers to:

  • Track Temperature and Relative Humidity Remotely

  • Safeguard Product and Inventory Quality With Customized Alerts

  • Improve Process Efficiency

  • Ensure Code Compliance

  • Run a Monitoring System with Minimum Maintenance

Learn more about how Sense can improve quality control, meet critical code compliance and improve facility efficiency.